Darryl Ford-Williams

Vice Presidenf of Prodcution for WQED

 

Darryl Ford-Williams is the Vice President of Production for WQED Multimedia in Pittsburgh.  Prior to her arrival at WQED in December of 2004, she was the sole proprietor of the 15-year-old Ford-Williams Agency.  Based in Pittsburgh, it was one of the first companies in the nation to focus on minority recruiting for major market television stations.  She was also a sought-after speaker on issues related to minorities in the broadcast industry.  In her current role at WQED, Ms. Ford-Williams oversees the creation, development, production and delivery of all new and existing local, national, international and syndicated programming for WQED Multimedia.

Throughout her career, Ms. Ford-Williams developed, wrote, produced and directed media campaigns and visual communications for business, political, educational and philanthropic entities.  Her extensive background as a television news producer and news manager served her clients well.  The following are just a few examples of that work:  managing site producer for CBS News in its coverage of September 11—focusing on the Pennsylvania crash site of United Flight 93; coordinating producer for ABC-TV’s Good Morning America; serving as executive producer at WJLA-TV in Washington, DC; and news production at KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh.

Ms. Ford-Williams worked as a producer and production consultant to WQED on a variety of projects, including productions as part of the “Act Against Violence” project in the mid-1990s.  She produced projects for Family Communications, Inc., producer of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, including “Challenging Behavior,” the “Taking Good Care of You” series, and “What Do You Do With the Mad That You Feel?”

Ms. Ford-Williams’ work was recognized with many awards throughout her career, including an Emmy Award for The Combat Zone, produced for WJLA-TV in Washington, DC.  She has been honored by the Easter Seals Society, International Association of Business Communicators, and the Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters. In September of 2006, she received a Mid-Atlantic Emmy Award for her role in WQED’s “On Q Special Report:  RX For A Healthier Community.” 

When it comes to community involvement, Ms. Ford Williams takes an active role.  She has served on such boards and committees as the Mayor’s Commission on Families; Point Park University; Urban Youth Action; the Pittsburgh Film Office; Pittsburgh Ballet Theater; Shady Side Academy; Program to Aid Citizen Enterprise; and the African American Chamber of Commerce of Western Pennsylvania.  She is a graduate of Boston College with a BA/BS in Speech Arts.


Welcome to the CLOSING THE GAP initiative.

Gender wage ratio data show that in 1960 women earned 60.7 cents compared to a dollar earned by men. More than 50 years later, the ratio hovers at 76.5 cents to one dollar. At this pace, it is projected it will take another 45 years to approach pay equity.

Closing the Gap: 50 Years Seeking Equal Pay explores why the pay gap persists and how to improve it. We hope to arm women with information and skills to assist them in earning fair pay throughout their own careers and toward a secure retirement.
 

A special thanks to our sponsors:

Eden Hall Foundation   |  Chatham University  |  Mary Hillman Jennings Foundation

Cathy Raphael   |  Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC   |  MSA   |  Georgia Berner

Darryl Ford-Williams

Vice Presidenf of Prodcution for WQED

 

Darryl Ford-Williams is the Vice President of Production for WQED Multimedia in Pittsburgh.  Prior to her arrival at WQED in December of 2004, she was the sole proprietor of the 15-year-old Ford-Williams Agency.  Based in Pittsburgh, it was one of the first companies in the nation to focus on minority recruiting for major market television stations.  She was also a sought-after speaker on issues related to minorities in the broadcast industry.  In her current role at WQED, Ms. Ford-Williams oversees the creation, development, production and delivery of all new and existing local, national, international and syndicated programming for WQED Multimedia.

Throughout her career, Ms. Ford-Williams developed, wrote, produced and directed media campaigns and visual communications for business, political, educational and philanthropic entities.  Her extensive background as a television news producer and news manager served her clients well.  The following are just a few examples of that work:  managing site producer for CBS News in its coverage of September 11—focusing on the Pennsylvania crash site of United Flight 93; coordinating producer for ABC-TV’s Good Morning America; serving as executive producer at WJLA-TV in Washington, DC; and news production at KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh.

Ms. Ford-Williams worked as a producer and production consultant to WQED on a variety of projects, including productions as part of the “Act Against Violence” project in the mid-1990s.  She produced projects for Family Communications, Inc., producer of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, including “Challenging Behavior,” the “Taking Good Care of You” series, and “What Do You Do With the Mad That You Feel?”

Ms. Ford-Williams’ work was recognized with many awards throughout her career, including an Emmy Award for The Combat Zone, produced for WJLA-TV in Washington, DC.  She has been honored by the Easter Seals Society, International Association of Business Communicators, and the Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters. In September of 2006, she received a Mid-Atlantic Emmy Award for her role in WQED’s “On Q Special Report:  RX For A Healthier Community.” 

When it comes to community involvement, Ms. Ford Williams takes an active role.  She has served on such boards and committees as the Mayor’s Commission on Families; Point Park University; Urban Youth Action; the Pittsburgh Film Office; Pittsburgh Ballet Theater; Shady Side Academy; Program to Aid Citizen Enterprise; and the African American Chamber of Commerce of Western Pennsylvania.  She is a graduate of Boston College with a BA/BS in Speech Arts.


Welcome to the CLOSING THE GAP initiative.

Gender wage ratio data show that in 1960 women earned 60.7 cents compared to a dollar earned by men. More than 50 years later, the ratio hovers at 76.5 cents to one dollar. At this pace, it is projected it will take another 45 years to approach pay equity.

Closing the Gap: 50 Years Seeking Equal Pay explores why the pay gap persists and how to improve it. We hope to arm women with information and skills to assist them in earning fair pay throughout their own careers and toward a secure retirement.
 

A special thanks to our sponsors:

Eden Hall Foundation   |  Chatham University  |  Mary Hillman Jennings Foundation

Cathy Raphael   |  Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC   |  MSA   |  Georgia Berner

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